Crime increasing in Uruguay, expect electoral consequences

Brazen Crime Increasing:

Like it or not, the “rightwing” party is likely to win Uruguay’s presidential election in October, and here’s more evidence why: Increasing street crime in Uruguay, especially in and around the capital, Montevideo. In the latest brazen event, the Ambassador of Paraguay, out on his late-afternoon walk on the Rambla (the seaside walk) in a very posh section of Montevideo, was robbed and seriously injured.

Entryway of the Paraguay embassy, showing a wooden stairway to a recessed door on a white stucco building, with the flag of Paraguay to the right side of the stairway
Embassy of Paraguay in Montevideo, Uruguay. ©El Pais

 

Article is from Uruguay’s leading paper, El País.

Our Election Analysis:

Why do we at the Uruguay Expat Life / Uruguay For Me site network, share this and make that observation on what we think the election outcome will be? Not because El País has a traditional-rightwing editorial view, because this is a news report, not editorial, and is quite objective and factual. Rather, because there’s an increasing disgust in Uruguay among Uruguayans themselves about the level of street crime and home invasion crime. Like it or not, when crime goes up, the party in power gets blamed. The Frente Amplio has been in control of the Presidency for nearly 10 years now, two full terms, and in control of the congress as well.

The candidate standing, dressed in a dark suit and open-neck white shirt, wearing a Uruguayan flag lapel pin.
Frente Amplio Candidate Tabaré Vásquez.
©Fabio Pozzebom/ABr – Agência Brasil via Wikimedia Commons CC-BY-3.0-br

Plus, the official policy of outgoing-in-March President Mujica, as well as still leading-in-polls candidate, the FA’s Tabaré Vázquez (First president from the FA in the 2005-2010 term from the 2009 campaign), is to oppose lowering of the “Age of Impunity”*- the age of criminal responsibility as an adult, down to 16 from its present 18.

Whether in USA, Australia, UK, or here in Uruguay, when crimes get so violent and increase in prevalence, people want punishment. Even if these perpetrators (one is in detention) are over 18 (unknown from this article), it adds to the “FA soft on crime, Blancos tough on crime” mindset. Continue reading Crime increasing in Uruguay, expect electoral consequences

UK expats losing their Barclaycards. Plus tax hassles! – reblog from ExpatsBlog.com with our take on it.

Image of Barclaycard Platinum Visa card
Keep Calm and Kiss This Card Goodbye

Reblogging this financial bad news from ExpatsBlog.com, for the benefit of our many readers who are from the United Kingdom. Uruguay’s largest contingent of English-speaking expats most likely are from USA, but UK is right up there near the top. Usually the bad financial news, in terms of home-country-induced major inconvenience, is hitting the US folks. FATCA, FBAR, and being fired as a customer from every bank in Uruguay except for BROU. Along with some reports of US-based banks closing accounts for US citizens who moved here. (Fortunately has not happened to us, but we do have a US address too.)

This time it’s you Brits who are suffering. Well, along with the Scots, at least till the referendum, the Welsh, and the Irish in Northern Ireland, who have moved here or elsewhere. Barclays is closing your credit cards: Continue reading UK expats losing their Barclaycards. Plus tax hassles! – reblog from ExpatsBlog.com with our take on it.

Fall punctuated by rainbow

image

Autumn is definitely here in Uruguay. Sun setting early evening and light at low angle by mid-afternoon. Chilly at night and sometimes by day. I used the Supergas-fired estufa, large non-electric space heater, for the first time this year today when I got up, to take the chill off the living room. We’ve had the split aire acondicionado on in mild heating “Auto” mode the last few nights.

But sometimes there is beauty in the onset of the darkness. Continue reading Fall punctuated by rainbow

Today on Uruguay Flooded Life

Car nose-down in flooded and overlflowing drainage ditch
That’s the end of block, right at the corner of our shared yard.

The rains continue. Tormenta electrica sin fin. The drainage canals along the main road at the end of our street are totally overflowed. And apparently Uruguayans are no better than Los Angeles residents at driving in rain.
Continue reading Today on Uruguay Flooded Life

21 reasons for Uruguay, or 8 why it’s not all that?

A follower of our Uruguay Expat Life page on Facebook asked me to comment on this Global Post article 8 reasons Uruguay’s not all that; as a counterpoint to the Buzzfeed 21 reasons to move to Uruguay one that went viral last month.

Other than that he was kind of setting up the strawman fallacy, with that “in light of the Buzzfeed”, because I never said I really liked that Buzzfeed. I don’t. The Buzzfeed piece was a snarky silly goof article on unimportant stuff, because, Buzzfeed. I made fun of it at the time in various places, on some networks shared it much like a “Mujica smoking out in sandals” goof. Lisa and I shared it, but for fun. The articles shared about ratings on peace, freedom, economic stability, the Economist country of the year, the Economist’s good but not top level rank on countries likely to have protests – sure, serious discussions. But that Buzzfeed 21 reasons most involving pot, sandals, and what’s ol’ Tio Pepe growing out on his flower farm? But this Global post article is nearly as bogus non-serious as that. Or if the author of it, currently living in Uruguay, is, I have to say, “Surely you can’t be serious” about some of his complaint. Not all, but, the Post Office lines? Using this picture as argument?

A bunch of packages, 3 people, and actually nobody waiting in line.
Post offices everywhere. This one happens to be in Uruguay. That’s your argument?

I actually agree with much of this Global Post piece. But it, itself, is also a bit of a strawman fallacy. Which is why I don’t like all of it, but it’s a good “Whiny part-BS article” counterpoint to “Silly part-BS article”. Continue reading 21 reasons for Uruguay, or 8 why it’s not all that?