Residency Intro for those looking for a new country

Well, it’s mid-November 2016 as this post happens, and our site is getting hammered. Can’t imagine why all of a sudden so many people are considering moving to another country, jaja!

Entry to Ciudad Vieja
Entry to Ciudad Vieja from Plaza Independencia in Montevideo

If you are, please do be thoughtful about what, where, why, when, and how you do it. We try to stay out of partisan politics here at the Uruguay Expat Life & Uruguay For Me site network, though we have in the past reported on our perceptions of the Uruguay elections, in terms of describing how it works. But if you are thinking of moving here, perhaps from the USA (hmm, why all of a sudden?) please do understand that changing countries is nothing to be taken trivially.

We’ve covered some of the process of getting residency, of being here legally as a legal immigrant (that is what an “expat” indeed becomes if you are looking to be here permanently or for the indefinite future), and we’ll have more to say about it, in a more organized way, with resources links, in an upcoming “Uruguay Basics” series article. And even more in a deeper-dive article.

But due to the huge, tremendous recent interest, so big we’ve had to make the firewall higher, here are a few crucial concepts. Granted, mostly a stream-of-consciousness “Thinking about it? Here’s the scoop” kind of quick piece. Here you go:

Pan de Azucar "Sugarloaf" mountain looking from Pan de Azucar city
Pan de Azucar “Sugarloaf” mountain looking from Pan de Azucar city

Continue reading Residency Intro for those looking for a new country

Our “Uruguay For Me” network and affordable consultations via Plansify (Now closed)

UPDATE: As of January 17, 2017, the Plansify service has been closed, with one day of notice, by its owners. We apologize for the inconvenience, but please direct any issues to its founder/owner, the well-known and excellent travel-blogger, “Wandering Earl”. Thank you for your trust in our consultation services to the many clients, several who became friends, during the time that Uruguay For Me / Uruguay Expat Life co-publisher Mark Mercer was a Plansify Advisor. And thank you for the consistently high ratings you gave! Sometime during the remainder of Q1 or during Q2 2017, as part of an overall overhaul of our online presence including a redesign of this website, we may be launching a direct, low-cost, paid consultation service via our to-be-launched full UrugayFor.Me website.

We are interested in your comments and suggestions for what you might like that service to be, price ranges for consultation (our last-year Plansify price was $21 USD for a 3-question detailed email session and $65 for a 1-hour Skype or similar voice-call. A chunk of that went to “Wandering Earl” and his partner, which if we do a direct service, we won’t have reducing our revenue, so we might go slightly lower.) Please feel free to use the Contact Form right here on this website, to send us your suggestions and ideas. Please don’t ask for or expect free personalized advice, because things of value are worth paying a fair price.

Meanwhile both Mark and Lisa are regularly adding short-to-medium-length content on our Facebook Page (publish/comment-only, we don’t do messaging or allow posting there), and both host and as members, participate, in the Uruguay Expat Life Community at Google. At that community/forum, we do sometimes share specific advice and ideas, though not as detailed or researched as when we’re getting paid to do it! Also, too-rarely, post updates to our @UruguayForMe Twitter. All of which can be found from the links right here on the sidebar and menu of this website.

Thank you for the continued great feedback for our “Uruguay For Me” consultations  we offer via the innovative “Plansify” service. Mark Mercer is the official Plansify consultant, invited at the launch of the service last year by famous travel blogger, Plansify founder “Wandering Earl”. Uruguay Expat Life/Uruguay For Me co-owner, travel author Lisa Marie Mercer, also is involved in the research and consultation process. It’s a great value for personalized research and perspective for your questions about expat life in Uruguay.

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The costs are quite low (though they are increasing slightly in Mid-July, so you may want to book now! We’ll honor previous pricing for confirmed bookings), and we do research specific to your questions. Whether you choose the “three detailed email questions” or the “One hour Skype call” option, you can give some background on your issues ahead of time, so that we can do our best to get your relevant-to-you answers. How relevant? Please check Mark Mercer’s feedback at Plansify.com/markmercer to read real client responses. Based on sessions done and feedback received, we’re humbly pleased that Mark is on the front page of their long list of advisors, sharing the page with well-known travel and expat luminaries like “Wandering Earl” (and Plansify co-founder) Derek Baron himself, and widely-published financial consultant and long-term traveler Nora Dunn, among other top advisors.

Traveling or moving elsewhere? We encourage you to consider them, and the other Plansify consultants, for your non-Uruguay destination needs. (We do NOT get any commission for your booking of anyone other than Mark – this is a straight-up recommendation based purely on thinking the service, and their list of advisors, is a great idea!)

In case we haven’t explained it recently, our “Uruguay For Me” branding with its “name tells the story” UruguayFor.Me website address, is the paid-services part of our overall site network. At least, the starting-to-monetize, as the startup culture calls it, part of our offering. “Uruguay Expat Life”, including this website here at UruguayExpat.Info (another of our “the name tells the story” domains), is and will always be our “internet gift culture” part of the overall “Uruguay Expat Life and Uruguay For Me Site Network”. Continue reading Our “Uruguay For Me” network and affordable consultations via Plansify (Now closed)

Get personal advice on Uruguay living and travel – Now at Plansify!

We at Uruguay Expat Life & Uruguay For Me enjoy sharing our experiences, creating internet communities where other folks considering life in Uruguay gather to chat, and meeting and conversing with other expats, immigrants, slow travelers, who may be wondering if Uruguay is for them. That’s why we created and offer so many different free options for online community, like all the ones in our menu up top. Including the very popular Uruguay Expat Life Community on the Google social platform. We will continue to curate and encourage these communities, post our own observations here at the heart of our site network and on our social media sites, and encourage everyone to contribute. Lisa Mercer and I also get a lot of emails, private messages, and contact form responses, and we’re happy to give some quick info.

Sometimes what you need is more than just public social media and blog discussions, more than a short general reply to an email. When it comes to asking “Is Uruguay for me?”, that requires research, perspective, advice, and on-the-ground knowledge. Same with figuring out all the various travel alternatives and ways to maximize frequent flyer programs and schemes to afford the multiple trips you really should do before committing to live here. Now we have a way to help you with those details, via Plansify.

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I (Mark Mercer) am thrilled and honored to have been invited by famous travel blogger / entrepreneur “Wandering Earl” to be one of the Travel Advisors at Plansify.com, and it’s now live! You can book your consultation with me right now. Continue reading Get personal advice on Uruguay living and travel – Now at Plansify!

21 reasons for Uruguay, or 8 why it’s not all that?

A follower of our Uruguay Expat Life page on Facebook asked me to comment on this Global Post article 8 reasons Uruguay’s not all that; as a counterpoint to the Buzzfeed 21 reasons to move to Uruguay one that went viral last month.

Other than that he was kind of setting up the strawman fallacy, with that “in light of the Buzzfeed”, because I never said I really liked that Buzzfeed. I don’t. The Buzzfeed piece was a snarky silly goof article on unimportant stuff, because, Buzzfeed. I made fun of it at the time in various places, on some networks shared it much like a “Mujica smoking out in sandals” goof. Lisa and I shared it, but for fun. The articles shared about ratings on peace, freedom, economic stability, the Economist country of the year, the Economist’s good but not top level rank on countries likely to have protests – sure, serious discussions. But that Buzzfeed 21 reasons most involving pot, sandals, and what’s ol’ Tio Pepe growing out on his flower farm? But this Global post article is nearly as bogus non-serious as that. Or if the author of it, currently living in Uruguay, is, I have to say, “Surely you can’t be serious” about some of his complaint. Not all, but, the Post Office lines? Using this picture as argument?

A bunch of packages, 3 people, and actually nobody waiting in line.
Post offices everywhere. This one happens to be in Uruguay. That’s your argument?

I actually agree with much of this Global Post piece. But it, itself, is also a bit of a strawman fallacy. Which is why I don’t like all of it, but it’s a good “Whiny part-BS article” counterpoint to “Silly part-BS article”. Continue reading 21 reasons for Uruguay, or 8 why it’s not all that?

Uruguay Residency Process – slower, not harder. Unless you don’t really want to live here.

Uruguay Residency Attorney Mark Teuten

Our friends at Paradise Uruguay just published this from one of the better-known Uruguay Residency Attorneys, Mark Teuten.  Check out the rest of the article at the Paradise Uruguay Blog: Uruguay Residency Process Taking Longer.

Some Fair Use excerpts…

Recent information made available from the Uruguayan Immigration Office shows that 2012 was a record year for the number of applications filed: 5347.

I’m happy to say that Lisa and I were two of those 5347 applications filed last year.

At the same time only 2426 applications were granted, so the backlog is still growing and applicants can now expect to be waiting 2 years for their application to be granted.

Nope, we’re not any of those 2426. Though we only began the official process mid-2012, so wouldn’t expect to be yet. Even if we had all our paperwork up to date, which we don’t for a few reasons, like getting a RealJob and then deciding to go back to freelancing (changed the “moda de vida”), Uruguay changing from the “Legalization” system for documents to the Hague Treaty on Apostiles on the very day our freshly-ordered NYC marriage certificate finally arrived at the Consulado-General of the ROU in NYC, so now I have to get a new one with a NYC, then New York County, then New Your State set of certifications but none by Uruguay…

Not really the fault of Migraciones. Mostly circumstances and timing. Continue reading Uruguay Residency Process – slower, not harder. Unless you don’t really want to live here.